Friday, August 4, 2017

OW OPENS UP


OW'S ROLL OF HONOUR:
Sea Games – 1973 Singapore (2nd), 1975 Bangkok (gold), 1977 Kuala Lumpur (gold), 1979 Jakarta (gold)
Asian Games – 1974 Tehran (third),
Olympics – 1976 Montreal (8th), 1980 Moscow (boycott), 1984 Los Angeles (11th)
World Cup – 1978 Buenos Aires (9th), 1982 Bombay (10th)
Lahore International Hockey tournament 1976 (4th)
Esanda World Hockey tournament 1979 (9th)
Nehru Memorial tournament New Delhi (3rd)
Inter Continental Cup KL 1981 (2nd)
Pesta Sukan Singapore 1981 (champion)
Captained the Malaysian team – 1979-1982
Voted Malaysian Hockey team Player of the year for Malaysian Sportsman of the Year Award - 1979, 1980 and 1981
Voted best player – Jakarta Sea Games, Esanda World Hockey tournament
Olympic Council of Malaysia Hall of Fame - 2013
 Member of the Malaysian Hockey Federation (now Malaysian Hockey Confederation - MHC) disciplinary board from 2008 to 2009
 Independent Council member of MHC from 2010 to 2012.
Penang State Hockey Association in 2012
Relinquished his independent post and became MHC Council member by virtue of president of PHA.
Elected as a vice-president of the MHC at their annual general meeting in 2015.





 At the Press Conference on Wednesday  

Level Field


THE Malaysian Hockey Confederation (MHC) probably have got more than they bargained for with too much on the plate to chew, after their former coaching chairman Datuk Ow Soon Kooi’s clarifications.

Ow held a press conference of Wednesday with regards to his resignation as the vice-president of MHC, chairman of the coaching committee and a member of the national team’s management committee and to state some facts and figures with regards to his work with MHC.
What he had revealed surely must have ruffled some feathers in the MHC hierarchy.
However, it was not Ow’s intention to go on a witch-hunt or to point fingers at anyone, but merely to state his case with facts and figures to clear his tarnished reputation as a corporate figure by media reports with regard to his resignation and his background.
It was indeed a surprise that Ow had called for a press conference because he is one who shuns publicity and who works from the background without getting into the limelight.
But it was obvious Ow – a double Olympian (Montreal 1976, Los Angeles 1984), double world-cupper (Buenos Aires 1978, Bombay 1982) and the only Malaysian hockey captain (1979-1982) – was hurt the way his image was tarnished after relinquishing his posts in MHC where he had served with honesty, sincerity and above all the passion for the game. 
Ow, a former senior police officer who hails from Penang, would have been a three-time Olympian had Malaysia not boycotted the Moscow Olympics in 1980.
Ow has served the sports for good 40 years as a player, coach and hockey administrator. He was elected as a vice-president of the MHC at their annual general meeting in 2015.
The least he should have been accorded when he decided to part ways with the game, was appreciation and thank you.

After all his reason stated when he relinquished all posts in MHC was because of his cervical spondylosis which was affecting his health and was in constant pain.

But when his integrity was in question, he probably was left with no choice but to come out in the open to clear his name.

Even at the Press Conference he remained his humble self and even efforts by the media to pinpoint personnel for his decision to opt out of the game he loved so much, he blamed no one or threw brickbats anyone.

He was magnanimous in wishing MHC all the very best and even said that his former teammate Soon Mustapha, who is the new coaching chairman has all the credentials to head the committee and was confident that he will do a good job.

At the Press Conference, he was merely stated facts to say that his coaching committee members had worked hard and did their job in all sincerity to help uplift the standard of the game in the country.

Of course, when they could no longer execute their roles effectively, four members of the coaching, decided to tender in their resignation after they found out that Ow had tendered his resignation.

The four were former national skippers R. Ramakrishnan (two Olympics, three World Cups, 1978 World Cup captain), Ahmad Sayuti (former international), Lam Sau Foong (ex-Malaysian women’s captain), Shahbuddin Royani (Johor hockey secretary).

Another former women’s hockey captain, K. Maheswari, had resigned from the committee much earlier because of her work commitment.

All were present the Press Conference in support of Ow.

Ow must have surely done something right and for the good of hockey, purely based on the support shown to him with the number of people who turned up to the Press Conference.

Present was a line-up of who’s who in Malaysian hockey – former MHF secretary general and international umpire Datuk G. Vijayanathan, 1975 World Cup captain Datuk N. Sri Shanmuganthan, his teammates T. Pathmarajah, M. Mahendran and Datuk Poon Fook Loke, Gurmit Singh, M. Sambu, Datuk Mirnawan Nawawi, Mary Soo and Teh Siew Bee to name a few. Also present was former national juniors coach Balbir Singh.

Ow clearly stated his only agenda to be involved in hockey was to give back to the game which has given him so much.

“I just wanted a platform to give back to the game I am very passionate about and which has made me what I am today,” said the 61 year-old who played as right-inside half during his heydays.

It was his love for hockey and people who cared for him, that made a difference in his life.

“I cannot forget my early days when I was struggling to make ends meet and even applied for exemption for school fees of $7.50 from the State Education department who granted me the exemption,” recalled Ow of his early days.

“Penang Free School was noted for its prowess in hockey and the hockey teacher N. Velu Pillay played a key role in developing me,” revealed Ow who was in Francis Light School during his primary school days.

“I am indeed lucky to be what I am today and owe it to many people along the way. I am forever indebted to them.

Ow, is tenth from a poor family of 13 in Georgetown, Penang.

“That is why, I give back to the game whatever I can and never forget my roots,” said Ow.

After school he started off as a waiter at a hotel in Penang.

But he was sacked after a while as he was taking too much time-off for hockey.

It was then that Osman Kamal, hockey convenor of Penang Port Commission PPC), who was the PPC’s security chief, who saw Ow play and was impressed.
Osman found out that Ow was jobless and was from a poor family and decided to offer him a job as a fireman in 1974 before moving up to be a security clerk.

"Osman was my ‘godfather’. If not for him spotting me and encouraging me, I will not be what I am today.”

Ow then applied to join the Police Force, where Osman assisted again and was recruited as Probationary Inspector in 1976 and retired at the age of 40 as Chief Inspector before moving onto the corporate world.

Probably Ow’s only mistake was that he only knows to work by following structures and rules laid down, as a corporate figure and former police officer.

Without doubt Ow is among the rare breed of sports administrators who is not only passionate of the game, but is in the game to give what he can and not take what he can or has ulterior motives and agendas.

His decision to withdraw himself from the sporting world is indeed a great loss. But at this moment his health is of paramount importance, and his decision must be rested and wish him all then best to get better in his health.

But rest assured, knowing Ow, he will continue to help sports and people n anyway he can and as usual from the background without any fanfare and publicity.

TONY is a sports
journalist with close to
four decades’ experience
and is passionate about
local sports.
He can be reached at
tmariadass@gmail.com



Friday, July 28, 2017

MONSTER SEA GAMES CARNIVAL NEEDS A TRIM



    



 WHY has the SEA Games grown into a monster carnival? Veering from being a hunting platform for the development of future sport stars in the region.
Many will point the finger to the South East Asian Games Federation (SEAGF) — the governing body which was founded in June 1959 with six founder countries — Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Malaya, Thailand and Vietnam — which has now grown to 11 — with the inclusion of Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, Brunei and Timor Leste.
What do we blame this runaway train on? For starters, Rule 34 of the SEAGF Charter clearly defines that the programme is be selected by the host.
While the main grouse is a flotilla of irrelevant sports, the first rule states: a minimum of 22 sports, with events contained therein to be determined based on the following criteria:
— 34.1: there shall be no artificial events… unless the same are already practised in the Olympic or Asian Games; — 34.2: a minimum of four NOCs must participate in a sport/event for it to be included …;
— 34.3: with the exception of Athletics, Aquatics, and Shooting, other sports shall not have more than 5 pct of the total number of events or medal tally;
— 34.4: Following the existing guidelines of Athletics and Aquatics (swimming, diving, water polo) being Compulsory Sports, with a minimum of 14 sports from Category II (35 events listed; sports in Olympics and Asian Games) and a maximum of 8 sports from Category III (15 events listed), South East Asian Games Federation Charter (as at 30 May 2010) 11 sports programme in the SEA Games should give priority or preference to sports already included in the IOC and / or OCA sports programmes.
— 34.6 Each adopted sport must belong to an existing International Sport Federation (IF) and / or an Asian Sport Federation (ASF); 34.7 The Organising Committee may hold as a “Demonstration Sports”, one (1) sport, subject to approval…
With the rules in place to safeguard the Games from exploding, the finger now shifts to the host nation for picking winnable sports to favour itself.
What started with 12 sports in the inaugural Games in Thailand in 1959 has grown to an average of 30 sports or more. While the KL Games will see 38 sports, the highest number was in 2011 when Indonesia hosted the 26th Games with 44 sports!
The other issue is the accelerating cost for a host, where the Games reflects economic clout, with grand opening and closings. Malaysia’s budget to host both the upcoming SEA Games and Asean Para Games exceeds RM400 million.
The Philippines has just pulled out of the 2019 Games, after a two-month running war with Islamic militants. It agreed in 2015 to host the 2019 SEA Games after Brunei and Vietnam declined.
On ways to cut costs, veteran sports administrator who is also an honorary member of SEAGF, Datuk Sieh Kok Chi, suggested reducing the number of sports, stop engaging consultants and agents, early planning and using existing facilities.
Datuk A. Vaithilingam, former Selangor Schools Sports Council secretary general, said: “Hosts add too much fanfare to the Games.”
Another observer said: “It seems to me the primary objective of any host in the SEA Games is to win the most gold medals. Hence the… little known sports.”

TONY is a sports journalist with close to four decades’ experience and is passionate about local sports. He can be reached at tmariadass@gmail.com


BLOG VERSION

COMMENTARY   

Level Field

Let’s make the SEA Games lean and mean

Who should take responsibility for the SEA Games having growing into a monster carnival instead of a Games as a platform for the development for future stars in the region and a Games of reputable standard?

Many will point the finger to the South East Asian Games Federation (SEAGF) – the governing body of Games which was founded in June 1959 with six founder countries – Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Malaya, Thailand and Vietnam – which has now grown to have eleven members – with the inclusion of Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, Brunei and Timor Leste.

However, the SEAGF, in their Charter and Rules under Rule 34 (Programme), have clearly defined the programme to be selected by the host of each Games.

While the main grouse of sports observers and critics is that the Games has grown too big and with some irrelevant sports being included, the programme’s first rule states:

The sports programme adopted for any one SEA Games shall consist of a minimum 22 sports, with events contained therein to be determined based on the following criteria:
34.1 there shall be no artificial events, especially for those adopted team events, unless the same are already practiced in the Olympic or Asian Games.

34.2 a minimum of four NOCs must participate in a sport/event for it to be included in the programme of the SEA Games, with a proviso to allow varying the same as and when required.

34.3 with the exception of Athletics, Aquatics, and Shooting, other sports in the SEA Games programme shall not have more than five (5%) percent of the total number of events or medal tally.

34.4 Following the existing guidelines of Athletics and Aquatics being Compulsory Sports, with a minimum of 14 sports from Category II and a maximum of 8 sports from Category III, South East Asian Games Federation Charter (As at 30 May 2010) 11 sports programme in the SEA Games should give priority or preference to those sports that are already included in the IOC and/or OCA sports programmes.

CATEGORY I: COMPULSORY SPORTS

Athletics 2. Swimming (including Diving and water polo)

CATEGORY II: SPORTS IN THE OLYMPIC GAMES AND THE ASIAN GAMES (MINIMUM 14 SPORTS)
1. Archery 2. Badminton 3. Baseball 4. Basketball 5. Billiards & Snooker 6. Bowling (Tenpin) 7. Boxing 8. Canoeing 9. Cycling 10. Equestrian & Polo 11. Fencing 12. Football 13. Golf 14. Gymnastics 15. Handball 16. Hockey 17. Judo 18. Karate-do 19. Modern Pentathlon 20. Rowing 21. Rugby 22. Sailing 23. Sepak Takraw 24. Softball 25. Soft Tennis 26. Shooting 27. Squash 28. Table Tennis 29. Taekwondo 30. Tennis 31. Triathlon 32. Volleyball 33. Weightlifting 34. Wrestling 35. Wushu

CATEGORY III: OTHER SPORTS (MAXIMUM 8 SPORTS)
1. Arnis 2. Bodybuilding 3. Chess 4. Dance sport 5. Fin swimming 6. Lawn Bowls 7. Kempo 8. Muay 9. Netball 10. Petanque 11. Pencak Silat 12. Shuttlecock 13. Traditional Boat Race 14. Water skiing 15. Vovinam

34.6 Each adopted sport must belong to an existing International Sport Federation (IF) and/or an Asian Sport Federation (ASF)

34.7 The Organising Committee may hold as a “Demonstration Sports”, one (1) sport, subject to the approval of the Executive Committee

With the rules in place to safeguard the Games from turning into a carnival and to keep in line to keep the Games respectable, the Games have still become huge with many irrelevant sports.
Basically, it is the host nation who is to be blamed for increasing the number of sports, especially sports which they can win medals and tailoring the programme, especially increasing the number of events in their sports, to favour the host nation.

What started with 12 sports in the inaugural Games in Thailand in 1959 has grown to an average of 30 sports or more in recent Games.

While in Malaysia next month will see 38 sports contested, the highest number of sports in a Games was when Indonesia hosted the 26th Games in 2011, where 44 sports were competed!

Maye the SEAGF may want to consider reviewing their Category III in their programme of other sports, from their current minimum of two to eight to a maybe just two or maximum four, to keep the Games relevant to give priority to sports competed at the Olympic and Asian Games.

The other issue which is concerning about the Games is the accelerating cost of hosting the Games.

What used to be Games organised at minimum cost without all the fanfares, the Games has become an avenue to showcase the nation’s ability to make the Games grand scale with a lot of money spent on opening and closing ceremonies.

For instance Malaysia’s budget to host both the SEA Games and ASEAN Para Games exceeds RM400 million.

And it is no surprise that we find countries withdrawing from hosting the Games after initial acceptance according to the rotation basis of hosts, as economic situations and other priorities issues of utilising available funds force them rethink.

The Philippines has pulled out of hosting the 2019 Games citing the government’s focus on rebuilding a city ravaged by a two-month battle between security forces and Islamic militants.

The country’s sports officials formally abandoned their plans to host the games after a series of meetings with President Rodrigo Duterte, Philippine Sports Commission chairman William Ramirez said.

The Philippines agreed in 2015 to host the 2019 SEA Games after two other countries, Brunei and Vietnam, declined.
There have several suggestions by sports observers and veteran sports administrators to reduce costs of hosting the Games.

Veteran sports administrator who is also an honorary member of the SEAGF, Datuk Sieh Kok Chi suggested reducing the number of sports, stop engaging consultants and agents, early planning, using existing sports facilities and finally decide on an affordable budget and work within this budget with strict controls.

Datuk Vaithilingam Ampalavanar, former Selangor Schools Sports Council secretary-general, said: “Hosts add a lot of fanfare to the Games which was not necessary and can help cut overall cost.”

He asked if show case of entertainment just to satisfy the Tourism and Cultural divisions was necessary.

“Do entertainment shows in the world organise sports for their ceremonies,” he asked.

“Do International Conferences organise such extravagant ceremonies?
Why only for International Sports? For athletes the Games is their priority, not musicians and dancers,” he asserted. 

He pleaded: “I am not exaggerating, please have only sports and save sports! Not promote culture, entertainment and tourism.”

Maybe sports has evolved and sports these days entails sports tourism, but still it can be done in moderation and not spend exorbitant sums of money on entertainment.
Another observer said: “It seems to me the primary objective of any host in the SEA Games is to win the most gold medals! Hence the games are enlarged to accommodate little known sports so that the host is strong.”

Datuk Dina Rizal, who has been associated with sports for decades said:
“Change the mind-set to produce Sea champions not national heroes.

“Forget this patronising attitude each time a host nation organises SEA Games to include sports to please host nation and losing the Olympic and Asian targets.”

Indeed it is time to make the Sea Games more relevant to the development of sports in the region to make headway at the Asian level for starters.

TONY is a sports
journalist with close to
four decades’ experience
and is passionate about
local sports.
He can be reached at
tmariadass@gmail.com



Friday, July 21, 2017

DOWN TO THE WIRE



    


  THE overall champions of the Kuala Lumpur SEA Games will be determined by the country winning between 80 to 90 gold medals and not 100 or more gold medals.
While Malaysia’s target as hosts is to finish overall champions with over 100 gold medals, a feat that would match the 2001 haul of 111 gold medals when we last hosted and emerged champions, Thailand could spoil the fairytale ending.
At the 2001 Games, Thailand attained 103 gold medals to end up as runners-up. Thailand have boldly predicted a 100-gold tally for this year’s Games.
If Malaysia and Thailand’s target are met, it will mean out of 11 participating countries, these two would bag 210 gold medals out of 405 at stake from 38 sports.
While both Malaysia and Thailand managed to win more than 100 medals at the 2001 Games, standards have risen.
Others like Indonesia have always been keen competitors. Vietnam have emerged as a strong contender in recent years.
An average of gold medals won calculated over the last four Games, sees Thailand topping the list with an average of 96 gold; having emerged champion in 2009 (83 gold medals), 2011 (100), 2013 (107) and 2015 (96).
Indonesia who hosted the 2011 edition have an average of 78 gold medals over four Games, winning 151 gold medals when they were host, 53 in 2009, 65 in 2013 and 47 at the last (2015) Games in Singapore.
Lesser countries like Cambodia, Laos, Brunei and Timor Leste, can win between one and five gold medals between them.
Purely based on averages, all indications are the overall champions will win less than 100 gold medals.
Olympic Council of Malaysia, assistant secretary and veteran and experienced sports official, Datuk Sieh Kok Chi, has boldly predicted Malaysia will emerge as champions — based on an analysis he did on winning patterns in the Games’ history and also the events picked for the KL Games.
His optimism stems from the removal of five sports from the 28th SEA Games programme that Malaysia did not win any gold or silver medals — canoe, floorball, rowing, softball and traditional boat race. This reduces the gold medal tally of Thailand by 11.
• Dropping five disciplines of the 28th SEA Games programme in which Malaysia did not win any gold — precision shooting, billiards/pools, keel boat and sanda.
• Addition of seven sports with 54 events that were not in the Singapore SEA Games — bodybuilding, cricket, ice hockey, ice skating, karate, lawn bowls, and weightlifting; Malaysia are strong in all seven.
• Addition of events in existing sports, such as track cycling, rhythmic gymnastics, squash and women’s football. (Track) cycling — sprint, team sprint, keirin, team pursuit, individual pursuit, omnium, scratch race, points race for men and women.
• And as hosts, he expects Malaysia to see between 10 per cent to 15 per cent improvement in the gold tally.
Based on Kok Chi’s analysis Malaysia can finish at the top with around 118 gold if
not more.
But despite all “tailoring”, indications are the battle of supremacy is going to be a close call between Malaysia and Thailand.
Among the sports making waves at international level include badminton, athletics, hockey, diving, swimming, track cycling, tenpin bowling, lawn bowl and archery. But the question going begging is whether Malaysians peaked too early?
But coaches have assured that all is going according to plan come Aug 19 — amidst the fact that many NSAs are still being coy about their gold forecast.
Will Malaysia’s “master plan” to emerge champion fall into place, or will the race with Thailand go down to the wire. The verdict be known on Aug 30 but everything points to the champions buoyed only by about 90 gold medals.
TONY is a sports journalist with close to four decades’ experience
and is passionate about local sports.
He can be reached at
tmariadass@gmail.com​


BLOG VERSION 

Level Field

Champion with less than 100 gold medals?

THE 2017 KL Sea Games overall champion country will be determined with the country winning between 80 and 90 gold medals and not 100 or more gold medals.
While Malaysia as host have declared that they are determined to emerge overall champion and see the need to win more than 100 gold medals and probably match the 2001 achievement of 111 gold medals when hosted the last time and emerged champion, Thailand will be the closest rival.
At the 2001 KL Games, Thailand attained 103 gold medals to emerge runners-up.
For next month’s Games, Thailand have boldly predicted 100 gold medal tally.
If Malaysia and Thailand’s target are met, it will mean that between these two countries out of the 11 participating countries, they would bag about 210 gold medals out of the 402 at stake from 36 sports.
While both Malaysia and Thailand managed to win more than 100 medals at the 2001 Games, the Games standards have risen and so has the standard of many participating countries.
Other countries like Indonesia have always been keen competitors in the Games, while Vietnam has emerged as strong contenders in recent years.
An average of gold medals won calculated over the last four Games, sees Thailand topping the list with an average of 96 gold medals having emerged champions in 2009 (83 gold medals), 2011 (100), 2013 (107) and 2015 (96).
Indonesia who hosted the 2011 Games have an average of 78 gold medals over four Games having winning 151 gold medals when they hosted, 53 in 2009, 65 in 2013 and 47 at the last Games in Singapore.
When Indonesia hosted, there were 44 sports and 545 gold medals at stake. At the 2009 Games in Vientiane there were only 29 sports and 372 gold medals at stake, while at the 2013 Games in Myanmar there were 37 sports and 460 medals were at stake. In Singapore two years ago, 36 sports were held for 402 gold medals.
Just based on the averages of the six out of 11 countries, a total of 418 medals would have been distributed between them.
What about other countries like Cambodia, Laos, Brunei and Timor Leste, who probably will win anything between one and five gold medals between them.
Purely based on averages, all indications are the overall champion will be determined by winning less than 100 gold medals.
No doubt Malaysia have calculated their medal hauls and are confident of a 100 gold medal and more, it is very unlikely to happen, even more so with Thailand equally confident of a 100 gold medal haul.
Olympic Council of Malaysia, assistant secretary and veteran and experienced sports official, Datuk Sieh Kok Chi, has boldly predicted Malaysia will emerge as champions and based on an analysis he did on winning patterns in the Games’ history and also the sports which have been carefully selected for the KL Games.
Among his reasons for optimism include the removal of five sports from the 28th SEA Games programme that Malaysia did not win any gold or silver medals — canoe, floorball, rowing, softball and traditional boat race. This reduces the gold medal tally of Thailand by 11.
• Dropping five disciplines of the 28th SEA Games programme in which Malaysia did not win any gold — precision shooting, billiards/pools, keel boat and sanda.
• Addition of seven sports with 54 events that were not in the Singapore SEA Games — namely, bodybuilding, cricket, ice hockey, ice skating, karate, lawn bowls, and weightlifting. Malaysia are strong in all seven.
• Addition of events in existing sports, such as track cycling, rhythmic gymnastics, squash and women’s football. (Track cycling — sprint, sprint team, keirin, team pursuit, individual pursuit, omnium, scratch race, points race for men and women.
• And as hosts, he expects Malaysia to see between 10 per cent to 15 per cent improvement in the gold tally.
Based on Kok Chi’s analysis Malaysia can finish at the top with around 118 gold if not more.
But despite all ‘tailoring’ indications are that the battle of supremacy is still going to be between Malaysia and Thailand and is going to be a close call.
And with next Games host Philippines and next year’s Asian Games host Indonesia, surely determined to put up a good show, the battle could well intensify.
While the sports and events for the KL Games have been carefully selected to give Malaysia an advantage – as it is usual in all previous Games with host – it is still no guarantee with all the predicted gold medals.
For starters, the National Sports Associations (NSAs) who were very optimistic with their medal target prediction when attended the selection committee meeting in June with the Olympic Council of Malaysia for their inclusion of their athletes for the Games, many have toned down of recent.
In a recent two-day meeting with all NSAs competing in the Games organised by the National Sports Council to determine the actual medal predictions for the Games, many NSAs have started to play down their chances or playing safe.
Among the reasons for their playing down their chances included injuries, opposition for rival countries and in some cases current forms of their athletes.
With the recent performances of athletes at world, Asian and international meets have given a positive impact for Malaysian sports in generally, but has directly added more pressure to perform at the Sea Games level.
Among the sports who have performed well at international level included badminton, athletics, hockey, diving, swimming, track cycling, tenpin bowling, lawn bowl and archery.
There is even questions being asked if the athletes have peaked too early and might have a problems at the Sea Games?
But respective coaches have assured that everything is going well and according to plan and they should have no problems rising to the occasion at the Games starting on Aug 19.
Many NSAs are still coy about making their targets openly, while many have come out openly to express their confidence to win gold medals in their respective sports.
Will Malaysia’s ‘master plan’ to emerge as champions all fall in place, or it will go down the wire having to fight tooth and nail to achieve its target, will all be known on Aug 30.
But everything points to the champion emerging by winning about 90 gold medal.

TONY is a sports
journalist with close to
four decades’ experience
and is passionate about
local sports.
He can be reached at
tmariadass@gmail.com