Saturday, June 8, 2019

Scout For Young Talents, FAM Urged



By Tony Mariadass
Ex-internationals are ever ready to become talent scouts to help Malaysian sports have a wider base of talent to select from, but are looking for a platform to offer their services.
Several ex-internationals upon reading NST Sports story yesterday – Talent Sadly ‘Lost’ – responded that it was the best way forward for Malaysian sports and were looking forward to be a part of plan, if it takes off.
Asian Football Confederation (AFC) general secretary, Windsor Paul John, had said that Malaysia already has a lot of talent and what was lacking was the talent scout culture in Malaysia sport.
He was responding to Sport Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman’s recent comment on plans to scout for young foreign football talent and train them at the Mokhtar Dahari Academy in Gambang, Pahang, under the National Football Development Programme (NFDP).
Former football international defender, Datuk Santokh Singh said the talent scouts should exist at all levels – national, state, clubs, districts and schools.
“FA of Malaysia and especially State FAs and clubs, should engage former internationals to be their talent scouts and comb the respective states, districts and school to look for talent to be recommended for further structured training,” said the Santokh who turns 67 on June 22.
“Talent scouting is part and parcel of football setup but sadly in Malaysia it hardly exists.
“We don’t make an earnest effort to look for the abundance of talent in Malaysia and then complain there is not enough players coming through the ranks,” said Santokh when met at the three day 68th Gurdwara Cup and Sikh Festival of Sports which ended yesterday at the Royal Selangor Club in Bukit Kiara.
“Just take this Gurdwara Cup where there are definitely talent players in football, hockey and netball especially when we have junior players competing. But where are the talent scouts. It does not matter how small a competition, if it is held in a remote area, communal in nature or organised by some parents or community, we need to the talent scouts out there.”
“During yesteryear. we have many talent coming through the clubs and state leagues for the state teams. Today these leagues are either non-existence or if run, it poorly managed, the quality of the league is poor and number of teams competing has dwindled. Thus we have to go out to the districts, villages, school and search for the talent.”
Another ex-international Datuk M. Karathu said besides the states and clubs, the Ex-Internationals Association too has to be a role to push the talent scouting agenda to the relevant bodies.
“While States and clubs should engage their former state and ex-internationals to be actively involved in their development programme which besides conducting coaching clinics should also involve talent scouting, the ex-international association should make a strong effort to push their members to be absorbed by the state and club teams.
“Yes, we have ex-internationals who are coaching teams, but there are many more ex-internationals who do not want to be involved at the highest level but prefer to work at grassroots level,” said the 75-year former Perak player in the 60s to 70s, played for the national team and coached from national youth to several State teams.
Former National Coaching Board chairman, Sheikh Kamaruddin Sheikh Ahmad said that Talent Scouting is better that Talent Identification.
“Talent scouts can pick up talents in specific sports as they see the children play the game which is much more effective manner to scout for talent,” said the Assistant Professor in Department of educational study at University of Putra Malaysia.
Kamaruddin related how the talent scout system was effective in the Kem Bakat, but suffered a natural death after a while because there was no follow through.
Another ex-international football, V. Kalimutu, said the direction to engage former internationals should come from the top management of state teams and clubs.
“But sadly the top management are more interested in immediate results and pay little attention to long term development programmes or for scouting fresh talent,” said the 73-year-old who is still actively involved in grassroots coaching.
The former NFDP coaching educator said that he personally had found more than 20 talented players from the annual Royal Selangor Club (RSC) International age-group tournament from the various local teams which competed and recommend them to NFDP and of which a majority were absorbed into the programme.
“Imagine the number of youth tournaments which go unnoticed and we lose out on missing many talented players.”
Datuk K. Rajagobal, coach of PKNS and former national coach and international said that with strong domestic leagues missing, talent scouting or elaborate development programmes needs to be in place.
“I came from the domestic league system playing for a small club called Hotspurs from Setapak where I lived and then played for bigger clubs like Cholan Youth and PKNS, before being spotted and drafted to the Selangor state team,” recalled Rajagobal.
“In PKNS we do not have talent scouts but have an elaborate development programme from seven year olds to 17, and we get our players coming through this system.
“But States have a wider area to cover and with the Leagues not as competitive as before, they need to have talent scouts to travel the length and breath and every corner of their respective states to look for talent. We can wait to get players from having trials.”
The NFDP has a talent scout department with a few talent scout coaches who work closely with the respective State technical directors of their programme, but certainly they could do with more talent scouts to reach out to wider areas.
Talent scouts is in fact non-existence in all sports.
This is where the Malaysian Olympian Association (MOA), headed by Karu Selvaratnam and who have more than 300 Olympian’s from various sports can be more proactive and aggressive to offer the services of the available members to the various sports.
MOA and Ex-State and Ex-National Footballers’ Association Malaysia, headed by Datuk Soh Chin Aun, certainly have to knock hard on the doors of respective sports national and state associations, and clubs, to engage their members as talent scouts, as part of giving back to the game and also to ensure a brighter future for Malaysian sports.
However, it is important that these talent scouts are remunerated for their services and time.
Indeed, it is time for sports in Malaysia to make talent scouting as part and parcel of their respective sports master plan.
Ends.

Let's Aspire To Be Different







 Talent scouts the way to go forward


Youth and Sport Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman had recently said that considerations are in the air to scout for young foreign football talent and train them at the National Football Development Programme (NFDP) at the Mokhtar Dahari Academy in Gambang, Pahang, with view to naturalise these players to represent the nation in the future.
Was enough thought put into this idea before making the statement – like what kind of message is being put across local young talent under the NFDP, is this the way to go forward, is Malaysia really dearth of talent and will the proposal work.
NST Sport in an exclusive interview spoke to Asian Football Confederation general secretary, Datuk Windsor Paul John, on his thoughts on the idea.
Windsor having experienced an entire spectrum of football as player, coach and now administrator, bluntly put it that Malaysia has a wide base of talented players and there is no need to look for foreign talent.


By Tony Mariadass
Malaysia do not need to look for foreign talent to become a prominent football nation in the near because it was a wide base of talent which is not tapped.
These was the strong statement made by Asian Football Confederation (AFC) general secretary, Datuk Windsor Paul John.
“What Malaysian football needs is talent scouts to move forward and unearth the wide base of talent which is waiting to be spotted and polished to become gems,” said the 59-year-old Windsor when met at the AFC headquarters in Bukit Jalil.
“Talent scouts are part and parcel of the game all over the world but is non-existence in Malaysia.
“We do have to go far to look how the talent scouts’ systems works and its model. Just look at our neighbour have Thailand. Just look at the number of talented players it unearths and how football has progressed in the country.”
Windsor said the only form of talent scout that is existent in Malaysia is through coaches from the national or state bodies who occasionally go for youth tournaments to look for talented players.
“But these coaches, normally attend the final of a tournament. What happens to the odd talented players whose teams fail to make the final rounds?
“Teams may not do well and fail to make the final rounds, but there could be one or two players who are talented but because football is a team again and overall strength of the team is the full composition of the team, we lose these talented players because no one is there to pick them up.
“We have lost many players in this manner. But if talent scouts were present they could have picked up these players.”
Windsor also said that in Thailand there is national age-group tournaments for all age groups from 8 years old.
“This is the ground where thousands of young players can display their talent and get spotted. In Malaysia do we have a platform as wide spread like the Thais and is run over a period of time and not on carnival basis over weekends or couple of months,” he asked.
So who can be talent scouts and what is the criteria?
“Firstly one must an ‘eye’ to spot talent. Who has these ‘eyes’? Most of the time it is ex-state or international players, coaches, teachers or people who have technical knowledge of the game.
“Anyone can spot a player who is born gifted to play, but it takes a spotting ‘eye’ to identify talent. A talent does not have to be complete player. He can be someone who has a good left foot, good on both feet, good football sense, good physique among others.
“Talent scouts pick up uncut diamonds and polish them to become gems.”
So what is in it for talent scouts?
“Of course there must be remunerations for them. They can be hired on a fulltime basis as talent scouts for clubs or states. Ex-international associations can play role by offering their members.
“Coaches who can become talent scouts are those who do not make to the highest level as coaches.
“Individual talent scouts are plenty in Europe and they comb all youth tournaments to spot talent. These scouts have to be rewarded when the players they spot, sign their first contract.
“To ensure that everything is above board and does not violate contractual dealings, there has to be a guidelines set up for them to operate and adhere to it strictly.
“If Malaysia can set up this talent scout entity which becomes part of the footballs setup in Malaysia, we will without doubt see our talent base become wider and we need not look for foreign talent.”
Windsor said countries like Qatar rely on foreign talent who become citizens of their countries because they do not have a base.
“Locals in Qatar are not many who interested to play football. It is different in Malaysia because we have a football culture, football is the No 1 sport and played in every part of Malaysia.”
Windsor also warned about bring in young talent as contracts cannot be signed with players below 16 and between 16-18 it has to be a parental contract.
“And the possibility of these foreign young talent leaving to return to their home country before they come of age to sign contracts is also high.
“At the Aspire Academy in Qatar which the Sports Minister wanted to emulate, it was established in 2004 to find and develop the best young make Qatari athletes, whilst also providing them with high quality secondary school education. Eventually they also offered scholarships to foreign young talent with the hope of giving them citizenships and represent their nation.
“Since the population in Qatar is small the identification of talents was at an early age by cooperating with schools and sports federations. They have multi-sport skills development centres across Qatar to promote sports and prepare talented youth before they reach the appropriate age to be considered for the Academy. 

“In football they conduct scouting in the clubs and schools as well as having our own Talent Centres, then Feeder Groups, that start working with the boys at a very early stage and only the best young Qatari athletes and footballers receive scholarships to join Aspire.
Aspire also started the CSR initiative that is now known as "Aspire Football Dreams" in 2005, when Aspire Academy and the stakeholders in Qatar looked for a way to support developing countries in combination with helping local Aspire talents in their development.
Given the philosophy and background of Aspire Academy, providing scholarships and giving then 14-year-old boys the opportunity to get a profound education combined with the best possible environment to be able to start a career as professional football player, seemed to be the best fit.
The program was kicked off 2007 in Africa, involving seven countries and 430,000 young football players that were screened. In 2008 an extension to three continents (Asia, Africa, Latin America) took place to support more regions and children and a satellite branch of Aspire Academy was installed in Senegal. Since the start in 2007 until 2014 more than 3.5 million kids have been screened in 17 countries with 18–20 scholarships awarded each year.
“And these players are offered to represent Qatar,” said Windsor.
Thus, the Sports Minister’s suggestion to admit foreign talent at NFDP looks hard to fall in place.
Probably it is time that FA of Malaysia, State FAs and clubs seriously start thinking about establishing the talent scout culture and system into Malaysian football not only to create a wider base of talented pool of players for the domestic league, but also see Malaysian football standards rise in the near future.
Ends.

Brief on Datuk Windsor Paul John: 
Instilled with a lifelong passion for football, the former school teacher from Kedah featured for the state’s youth team and later extended his love for the game when he turned trainer for Selangor in 1992.
He then coached the Selangor President’s Cup team in 1994 and thereafter, went on to hold various positions in several organisations, including the Football Association of Malaysia and the Asean Football Federation. In 2001, Windsor joined FIFA as its Development Officer and later served as a performance consultant.
Since taking helm as the AFC General Secretary in 2015, Windsor has been instrumental in the implementation of the AFC’s new Vision and Mission under the guidance of AFC President Shaikh Salman bin Ebrahim Al Khalifa. Since its launch in January 2016, Windsor has spearheaded the restructuring and transformation journey of the AFC administration to bring to life the desired outcomes envisaged under the new Vision and Mission.
He has also led Asian football’s staunch stand against matching-fixing, as the AFC continues to be one of the most committed sport bodies in the world on the issue.
An avid believer of fostering unity in the world of football, Windsor has worked with his Executive team to implement the AFC’s partnerships with fellow Confederations and most recently, under his tenure, AFC President Shaikh Salman signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) and Confederation Africaine de Football (CAF) in 2016.
Throughout his career, Windsor has also been entrusted by FIFA in various senior capacities in several major football spectacles, which include five FIFA World Cups as well as the first in Asia – 2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan; the 2009 and 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup and the Copa America Centenario USA 2016.
His skilled expertise and meticulous attention to detail has also resonated across the AFC’s ever-improving competitions with the AFC Asian Cup 2015 Australia, the AFC Under-23 Championship Qatar 2016 as well as the AFC Champions League and AFC Cup, all achieving new records and milestones on multiple fronts, including spectatorship, fan engagement and T.V viewership.
A football man in every sense of the word, Windsor has set his sights to enhance the level of professionalism and capabilities of the AFC Member Associations as one of the key drivers to transform the AFC into the world’s leading confederation.



Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Sidney the bowling icon passes away




The wake will be held at Hall 18, 1st Floor Nirvana Memorial Centre, Jalan 1/116A, Off Jalan Sungei Besi, Sungei Besi, 57100, Kuala Lumpur on 4th and 5th June, 2019 from 3pm to 10pm daily. Burial will follow soon after 6th June 2019 at 12pm.

MALAYSIAN TENPIN BOWLING CONGRESS (MTBC) former secretary-general, Sidney Tung passed away yesterday in Petaling Jaya.
Sidney, who turned 74 on Jan 6, was an iconic figure for the sports of bowling, where he played a key role together with MTBC president Datuk Dr P. S, Nathan, from turning bowling which was regarded as a parlour sports to be recognised as an excellence sports and accepted into schools and became a family game.
An architectural designer and draftsman, Sidney was full of passion for the game and was the founder of Persatuan Tenpin Bowling Kuala Lumpur in 1976.
He has held many important posts in bowling which include being assistant secretary of MTBC  from 1978 to 1984, secretary-general of MTBC  from 1980-to 2003, Sport manager of 1998 Commonwealth Games and  (1996-1998), CEO of 2003 World Tenpin Bowling Championship to name a few.
At the international level he was  secretary of World Tenpin Bowling Association Asian Zone (now known as Asian Bowling Federation) 1994-1996, Member of ABF Tournament & Technical Committee (1997-2004), member of FIQ Membership Committee (1995-2003), deputy secretary-general WTBA  (1999-2003), WTBA Tournament Committee (1999-2003), WTBA World Ranking Committee (1999-2003) and WTBA Marketing Committee (1999-2003)
Positions he held in international organisations include Vice-president Asian Bowling Federation, vice-president Commonwealth Tenpin Bowling
Federation, ABF chairman statistic & award recognition committee, ABF Tour Ltd board member.
He was also an International official in following championships:
Technical delegate: East Asian Games, China (1993), Asian Youth
Championship, HK (1993), Hiroshima Asian Games, Japan (1994), East Asian
Games, South Korea (1995), AMF Bowling World Cup, Kobe (1998)
 Jury of appeal: World Youth Championship, HK (1996), SEA Games, Jakarta
(1997), SEA Games, Brunei (1999), Asian Championship, Doha (2000)
 Tournament Director: SEA Games, KL (1989), 1st WTTC, KL (1994), Asian
Youth Championship, KL (1996), Commonwealth Games, KL (1998)
 Tournament manager: SEA Games, Penang (2001), World Championship KL
(2003)
 Team manager: SEA Games (1981, 1985, 1987, 1991, 1995), FIQ Asian
Championships (1980, 1982, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998), FIQ World
Championships (1983, 1987, 1991, 1995, 1999), Asian Games (1986), AMF
Bowling World Cup (1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002).
Among the awards he received are PPN (Pingat Pangkuan Negara) from Yang Di Pertuan Agong (1990), AMN (Pingat Ahli Mangku Negara ) from Yang Di Pertuan Agong (1999), FIQ Silver Pin Award for outstanding contribution (1999).
His most cherished award the World Bowling Writers (WBW) awarded
him the Mort Luby Jr Distinguished Service Award for 2003.
The award was given for his tireless efforts in promoting
bowling worldwide.
Sidney is best remembered for calling the media in the late 70s and 80s from wherever he was to give them the latest results as he knew many considered bowling a parlour sport.
 Today bowling is covered widely by all local major newspapers as the
conception of the game has changed and is recognised as a competitive
sport.
Sidney had hoped to see bowling in Olympics.
Sdiney was a fatherly figure to Malaysian bowlers and many owe it to him for their rise in the game.
Sidney was popularly known as "Uncle Sidney' among the bowlers.
Rest in peace dear Sidney.


Thursday, May 30, 2019

Gone but not forgotten



Thursday, 30 May 2019, 11:48 AM
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7 minute read
Dahlan Zainuddin: Gone but not forgotten
https://assets.nst.com.my/images/articles/30nt04rbb_1559174923.jpg
Datuk Dahlan Zainuddin (right) in a scene from the 1979 movie ‘Kisah Seorang Biduan’. -NSTP/File pc
By TONY MARIADASS - May 30, 2019 @ 8:08am
KUALA LUMPUR: The golden voice of ever-green Datuk Dahlan Zainuddin of the 70s era may have been silenced with his passing on Tuesday, but his legacy, true to his famous song and film, Kisah Seorang Biduan, will forever live on and be etched in the memories of all.
Dahlan, 78, died on Tuesday at 9.48pm at Selayang Hospital after falling into a coma since Saturday, following a second stroke in four years.
He had touched many from different walks of life and I was blessed that I had known him for almost 42 years.
The down-to-earth artiste is not only friendly with his fans, but also went out of his way to keep musicians together as a family.
Dahlan, after 40 years of being in the music industry, was still promoting musicians.
I was 19 when I first met Dahlan in 1977 as my football captain of the New Straits Times team.
Football was in Dahlan’s blood and he was responsible for putting the NSTP football team in the limelight as the captain and coach of the team when he was working as a marketing executive with the newspaper.
How I remember my first trip to Bangkok, thanks to Dahlan, who organised a Juara Kugiran for NSTP staff and raised money to take the NSTP football team for friendly matches in Bangkok by train.
Our first trip to Kelantan was by the Sri Jaya bus with his band for concerts in Pasir Mas and Pasir Puteh after friendly matches with local teams.
Dahlan, who played as a forward or midfielder, first played for the Selangor Indian Association in the Selangor league before turning out for teams like Starlight Club, Chui Lok, Belia Sinaran and Mara.
Even when he was older, he continued to play in the veteran team of Ulu Kelang Recreation Club.
He only stopped playing in 2013 when he was not well and even kept away from singing for two years.
However, it was not long before he returned to singing in 2015 with a performance in the KTM railway event coach to Hat Yai.
“Singing is in my blood. I cannot stay away from it.
“Although I may have slowed down and do not perform as many shows, I am happy that my services are still sought and invited to perform at functions,” Dahlan said.
Dahlan continued to perform at functions, and was helping a veteran group of buskers, Melody Buskers. He sang with them once or twice a week at the Nasi Lemak Tanglin at the Tanglin Community Food court near Lake Gardens.
“My presence with them is to endorse the band and that to tell music lovers that we have good buskers who are experienced,” Dahlan said.
Asked if he was degrading himself by playing at a food court, Dahlan said: “I did not become a star overnight. I had to go through the mill and start from the bottom.
“I will never forget my roots and will always support any kind of music and played anywhere.
“Music is supposed to be played anywhere and without the support of the masses, we will not be popular.
“Besides, playing at a food court allows me to meet fans and it was also an opportunity to meet old friends in a relaxed surrounding.”
https://assets.nst.com.my/images/articles/30nt04raa_1559174928.jpg
Yang di-Pertuan Agong Al-Sultan Abdullah Ri’ayatuddin Al-Mustafa Billah Shah Sultan Ahmad Shah Al-Musta’in Billah speaking to the widow of Datuk Dahlan Zainuddin, Datin Effa Rizan (right), after funeral prayers at Masjid Saidina Abu Bakar As-Siddiq in Bangsar, Kuala Lumpur, yesterday. -NSTP/MOHD YUSNI ARIFFIN
Dahlan also had used sports to bring musicians together. On numerous occasions he organised football friendlies with artistes from neighbouring countries and also worked with music associations, such as Papita, Seniman and Karyawan, for many events.
He had indeed come a long way since starting to sing as a lounge and pub singer in the early 1970s.
Dahlan made his mark after competing in the Bintang RTM and won the Best Performer Award in 1975.
That year, he released his debut EP (extended play) album titled Kisah Seorang Biduan, which proved to be a hit and he went on to record two EPs, nine LPs (long play) and five CDs (compact discs).
He created history by becoming the first local singer to hold a concert at Stadium Negara in 1978 and also performed at the National Stadium in Singapore.
Dahlan also performed at the Malaysia Hall in London in 1976.
The Ipoh-born Dahlan spent his early days in Singapore where he had his primary education at the Telok Kurau English School before returning to Kuala Lumpur as a teenager.
He was also an actor and starred in the movie Kisah Seorang Biduan (1979), which was also the title of his debut album. He also acted in television dramas.
The NSTP football team was saddened when news of his first stroke broke and went on to organise a tribute dinner for him in January 2017.
Datin Effa Rizan, Dahlan’s wife of 40 years, was touched by the event held in her husband’s honour.
“We knew about the dinner, but we were surprised to see Dahlan’s old band here, too. I had known these men when they were just teenagers. How they have changed,” she had said.
“Seeing all of his old friends lifted his spirits and cheered him up.”
He almost brought tears to everyone’s eyes when he crooned Save the Last Dance for Me, which he sang in his well-known soft voice.
Dahlan leaves behind Effa and their children, Natasha Idha, 40, Mohd Danial, 35 and Athinia Ines, 24.
Another son, Akasya Iman died at the age of 12 because of leukaemia.

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Datuk Dahlan Zainuddin passes away




Datuk Dahlan Zainuddin, 78, passed away at 9.48pm at the Selayang Hospital after suffering a stroke on Saturday.
Deepest condolences to Datin Effa Rizan, his wife and children.
I have known Abang Dahlan since 1977 when I joined New Straits Times and played football for the company team. He was the captain of the team.
We have remained friends since then and know Effa since then too.
It is indeed sad to lose him and have fond memories with him.
Have written on him on several occasions which I have attached below and even organised a tribute night for him three years ago after he had suffered his first stroke.
Rest in peace dear Dahlan and you will always be remembered as a friend, excellent football player, singer, actor and one who has a heart of gold.


Tan Sri Ibrahim Kamil (former NST football team manager) presenting a souvenior to Dahlan at the tribute dinner

Tribute dinner organised by NSTP staff three years ago

Tributes paid to Datuk Dahlan:

ENTERTAINMENT ICON: Datuk Dahlan Zainuddin
Written in July 2016
By Tony Mariadass
 Dahlan’s heart of gold and voice
EVERGREEN singer Datuk Dahlan Zainuddin after 40 years of being in the industry is still contributing to promote other musicians.
The 76-year-old Dahlan has always been known to be down-to-earth artiste who is not only friendly with his fans, but has always went out of his way to keep the musicians as a family.
Dahlan a good footballer, has used the sport to bring the musicians together on numerous occasions by organising football friendlies with artistes from neighbouring countries and has worked very closely with musicians associations like Papita, Seniman and Karyawan for many events.
Dahlan who continues to perform at functions, is currently helping a veteran group of buskers, Melody Buskers – where he sings with them once or twice a week at the Nasi Lemak Tanglin at the Tanglin Community Food court near Lake Gardens.
“These buskers are an experienced lot, but have resorted to busking because they are no longer in demand. The guitarist, Hamron Kasim (Ayom) was my band member when I used the Kilat band 30 years ago,” said Dahlan who looks much younger than his age.
The other member of the Melody Buskers are Jalil Zain (bassist), Basharuddin (vocalist), Amri Ismail (guitar), Amir Ikhwan (cajon) and the rose among the thorns, vocalist Reny Kamalisa.
“My presence with them is to endorse the band and that to tell music lovers that we have good buskers who are experienced.
“But above all, I miss playing with a full band because most of the time when I perform these days I am asked to use ‘minus one’ to cut cost in hiring a band. Thus, singing with Melody Buskers allows me to continue to enjoy the joy of playing with a band.”
When asked if he was degrading himself by playing at a food court, Dahlan simply said:” I did not become a star overnight. I had to go through the mill and start from the bottom. I will never forget my roots and will always support any kind of music and played anywhere. Music is supposed to be played anywhere and without the support of the masses, we will not be popular.
“Besides, playing at a food court allows me to meet and mingle with my fans freely and also an opportunity to meet old friends in a relaxed and informal surrounding.”
Dahlan said many veteran musicians drop by to jam with the band and the venue also serves as a meeting point for his friends.
Dahlan paid tribute to Nasi Lemak Tanglin owner Zainal Abidin Hassan who is also the manager of Melody Buskers who accommodated the band to play at his stall and has created an atmosphere for the food court as patrons are entertained as they enjoy their food.
The band plays from 8am to 12 noon daily unless on nights when they perform at functions, when they take the next morning off.
Dahlan still commands a strong following where he has is ardent fans without fail having their Nasi Lemak and listening to him croon his evergreen songs.
He has indeed come a long way since starting to sing as a lounge and pub singer in the early 70s.
Dahlan, who is married to fellow singer Effa Rizan – his wife for 40 years – made his mark after competing in the Bintang RTM and won the Best Performer Award in 1975.
Effa sometimes joins Dahlan at the Tanglin Food court and while she sings occasionally, but in rare occasions one can catch Dahlan doing a duet with his wife.
“I rarely do duets with Effa because our voice tones do not match.Even when we do shows, we sing individually. But on rare occasions by demand of the audience, we may sing one song,” said Dahlan who has four children – Natasha, Danial, Akasya Iman (passed away at the age of 12 because of leukemia) and Anthenic Ines.
In 1975 Dahlan also released his debut EP (extended play) album titled ‘Kisah Seorang BIduan’ which was an instant hit and went on to record two EPs, nine LPs (long Play), five CDs.
Dahlan also created history by becoming the first local singer who had the opportunity to hold a concert at the Stadium Negara in 1978 and also performed at the National Stadium in Singapore.
Dahlan also had performed at the Malaysian Hall in London in 1976.
Dahlan, Ipoh born spent his early days in Singapore where he had his primary education at the Telok Kurau English School, before returning to Kuala Lumpur as a teenager.
The multi-talented Dahlan also was an actor acting in the movie as his debut album ‘Biduan’ and acted in television dramas too.
Football was in Dahlan’s blood and was responsible of putting the New Straits Times football team in the limelight as captain and coach of the team in the late 70s and early 80s, when he was working as a marketing executive with the newspaper.
The scribe had the honour of playing under Dahlan when the team competed in the Petaling Jaya District Business House League, Inter-Press Games in Singapore, Hong Kong and Thailand.
Dahlan’s who plays as a forward or midfield, first played for Selangor Indian Association (SIA) in the Selangor league before turning out for teams like Starlight Club, Chui Lok, Belia Sinaran and Mara and even when he was older, he continued to play in the veteran’s team of Ulu Kelang Recreation Club (UKRC).
He only stopped playing three years ago when he was not well and even laid off from singing for two years.
But he returned to singing last year with a performance in the KTM railway event coach to Hadyai where he performed together with Melody Buskers throughout the journey from Kuala Lumpur to Hadyai.
“Singing is in my blood. I cannot stay away from it. Although I may have slowed down a little and do not perform as many shows, I am happy that my services are still sought and invited to perform for functions.
“Right now, I enjoy very much singing with Melody Buskers where there is no formalities and I can just have a good time.”
Dahlan may have aged but he still stays relevant and continues to thrill his fans with his golden voice.



MEMORIES FROM NSTP DAYS WITH THE FOOTBALL TEAM